07. PRIME RIB ROASTED TWO WAYS

500 Degree Method and Traditional Method

500 DEGREE METHOD
Bring the prime rib roast to room temperature by removing it from the refrigerator, and allowing it to stand in a cool place, wrapped in its butcher-paper wrapping, for one to four hours. (The prime rib may be out of the refrigerator safely for up to four hours – longest time for largest roast). It is brought to cool room temperature so that the roast won’t be ice-cold in the center, and will cook evenly.Preheat the oven (for at least 1/2 hour) to 500 degrees. Note:This method cannot be used in electric ovens as the fans on electric ovens activate automatically once the oven is turned off, which will cool the oven too fast to allow a slow finish to the cooking process.Place the roast in a shallow baking pan, salt and pepper the roast. Stud with garlic clove slivers if desired.Place the roast in the preheated oven and time it – 5 minutes per pound.Turn off the oven. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR FOR TWO HOURS.The roast will now be medium rare, and ready to carve (no additional “resting” time is needed).

CLASSIC METHOD FOR ROASTING PRIME RIB

Remove the roast from the refrigerator about 2 hours (an hour or two more if it’s a very large roast) before roasting. Pat the surface of the roast very dry with paper towels – this promotes good caramelization (flavor and color) on the surfaces.

Preheat the oven thoroughly (at least 1/2 hour) to 450 degrees.

If desired, stud the roast with slivers of fresh garlic, using the sharp tip of a small knife to guide the garlic pieces into the meat.

Generously season the roast with salt and fresh-ground pepper.

Place the prepared roast into the preheated oven for 20 minutes (30 minutes if roast is very large). Reduce heat to 325 degrees, and continue roasting until desired temperature has been reached.

The total roasting time will be about 12-17 minutes per pound, for medium rare. You’ll want to start checking the internal temperature well before the estimated time – several of our listeners have reported that only 12 minutes per pound has produced a perfect medium-rare roast. Check the roast using an instant-read thermometer, inserted in the thickest part of meat, not touching bone. The thermometer should read 125 degrees for very rare, 128-132 for medium rare, about 135 for medium, about 140 for well done (which is not recommended as it will be dry).

Remove the roast from the oven and ALLOW IT TO STAND for 20-30 minutes before carving. This will complete cooking and allow internal juices to distribute themselves evenly throughout meat, so slices will be juicy.